AP News in Brief at 12:04 a.m. EDT

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McConnell delays vote on health care after McCain surgery

WASHINGTON (AP) Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Saturday he will delay consideration of health care legislation in the Senate, after Sen. John McCain's announced absence following surgery left Republicans short of votes on their marquee legislation.

McConnell's announcement amounted to another setback for GOP efforts, promoted by President Donald Trump, to repeal and replace "Obamacare" after years of promises. McConnell issued his statement not long after McCain's office disclosed that he had undergone surgery to remove a blood clot from above his left eye, and had been advised by his doctors to stay in Arizona next week to recover.

With McConnell's health care legislation already hanging by a thread in the Senate with no votes to spare, McCain's absence meant it would become impossible for the majority leader to round up the votes needed to move forward with the bill next week as planned.

"While John is recovering, the Senate will continue our work on legislative items and nominations, and will defer consideration of the Better Care Act," said McConnell, R-Ky. He did not say when he would aim to return to the health care bill.

Even before Saturday night's developments the fate of the health care legislation looked deeply uncertain in the Senate. In addition to two announced GOP "no" votes from moderate Susan Collins of Maine and conservative Rand Paul of Kentucky, there were at least a half-dozen other Republican senators who were withholding support from or expressing reservations about the bill McConnell released Thursday.

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Trump's no 'dying in the streets' pledge faces reality check

WASHINGTON (AP) President Donald Trump has often said he doesn't want people "dying in the streets" for lack of health care.

But in the United States, where chronic conditions are the major diseases, people decline slowly. Preventive care and routine screening can make a big difference for those at risk for things such as heart problems and cancer, especially over time.

That edge is what doctors and patients fear will be compromised if Republican efforts to repeal the Obama-era health law lead to more uninsured people. The uninsured tend to postpone care until problems break through.

It's a message that lawmakers are hearing from doctors' groups and constituents, in letters and emails, and at town hall meetings.

About 10 years ago, Cathy Cooper of Ocala, Florida, was battling a blood cancer. Against doctor's advice, she continued to work full time as a paralegal, through chemotherapy and radiation, just to preserve her health insurance. Cooper said she would schedule chemo on Fridays, spend the weekend sick from side effects and report back to work Monday.

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Honolulu fire: Victim remembered as talented and caring

HONOLULU (AP) A Hawaiian Airlines in-flight manager called his brother as smoke filled his 26th-floor apartment in Honolulu before he and his mother lost their lives in the blaze, the man's brother said.

Pearl City Community Church Pastor Phil Reller told The Honolulu Star-Advertiser (http://bit.ly/2tXsf7e) that police confirmed that two of the three victims killed in the blaze Friday are his mother and brother.

Reller told the newspaper he received a call from his brother, Britt Reller, 54, saying he had been taking a shower when he smelled the smoke. He rushed out but was unable to get to their 85-year-old mother, Melba Jeannine Dilley. He had crawled under a bed and wasn't heard from again, his brother told the newspaper.

Britt Reller had worked as an in-flight manager for Hawaiian Airlines for two years. In an emailed statement to The Associated Press on Saturday, Robin Sparling, vice president of in-flight services at the airline, said Reller "was a talented manager and caring co-worker and we will miss him terribly. Our hearts are with Britt's brother, Phil, and his entire family."

The fire broke out in a unit on the 26th floor, where all three of the dead were found, Fire Chief Manuel Neves said.

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Detroit at crossroads 50 years after riots devastated city

DETROIT (AP) Deborah Chenault Green is 62, a writer. But 50 years ago she was a pre-teen, sleeping on the porch to escape the oppressive heat, awakening to see a sky that glowed unnaturally.

Azerine Jones is a retired baker. But in 1967 she was the 12-year-old daughter of a barber who watched his business go up in smoke.

Gerard Townsend is 66 now, living in a seniors building near the Detroit waterfront. But a half century ago, he was just a kid on a city bus.

The bus stopped near 12th and Clairmount streets. Townsend stepped off and into the very start of the Detroit riot.

"I saw all these guys with masks and shields," he said city police officers, most of them white, far outnumbered by a seething black crowd.

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Turks commemorate 1 year since failed coup with huge march

ISTANBUL (AP) President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed to "rip the heads off" of terror groups and coup-plotters who tried to end his more than decade-long rule on Saturday, as Turkey marked the anniversary of the country's crushed military coup with a series of rallies and other commemorative events.

Accompanied by his family and the families of the victims of the coup, Erdogan joined a massive, flag-waving crowd near the iconic July 15 Martyrs' Bridge in Istanbul to remember 250 people who died on July 15, 2016 resisting the coup.

He inaugurated a hollow, globe-shaped monument featuring the names of the victims near the foot of the bridge, before flying to Ankara to attend a special session in parliament at the exact moment it was bombed a year ago. He also opened a second memorial opposite the grounds of his palace in Ankara.

"Exactly a year ago today, around this hour, a treacherous attempt took place," Erdogan told tens of thousands of people in Istanbul who converged at the bridge following a "national unity march."

"The July 15 coup attempt is not the first attack against our country, and it won't be the last," he said, referring to a series of terror attacks that also hit the country. "For that reason, we'll first rip the heads off of these traitors."

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NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts:

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NOT REAL: Trump Jr.: "My Russian Meetings Prove I'm A Real American That Knows How To Create Opportunities And Fake Advantages"

THE FACTS: Hoax site politicot.com published a lengthy defense attributed to Donald Trump Jr. of his meeting with a Russian lawyer last summer during the campaign against Hillary Clinton, featuring a screen grab of the president's son speaking on Fox News. Trump never made the remarks, with quotes like "our people value results above all else" and "the end justifies the means," in public statements. In his Fox interview this week, the president's eldest son called the meeting routine opposition research, but added he "probably would have done things a little differently."

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Feds appeal judge's travel ban ruling to Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (AP) The Trump administration is seeking to close a legal window opened for tens of thousands of refugees to enter the United States, appealing a federal judge's order directly to the Supreme Court.

U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson had ordered the government to allow in refugees formally working with a resettlement agency in the United States. His order also vastly expanded the list of U.S. family relationships that refugees and visitors from six Muslim-majority countries can use to get into the country, including grandparents and grandchildren.

In its appeal Friday night, the Justice Department said Watson's interpretation of the Supreme Court's ruling on what family relationships qualify refugees and visitors from the six Muslim-majority countries to enter the U.S. "empties the court's decision of meaning, as it encompasses not just 'close' family members, but virtually all family members. Treating all of these relationships as 'close familial relationship(s)' reads the term 'close' out of the Court's decision."

Only the Supreme Court can decide these issues surrounding the travel ban, the Justice Department said. "Only this Court can definitively settle whether the government's reasonable implementation is consistent with this Court's stay," it said.

On Saturday, the U.S. Justice Department asked the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to put Watson's ruling on hold while the Supreme Court considers its appeal.

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Cousins' lives escalate from petty crimes to alleged murder

PHILADELPHIA (AP) The cousins started small break-ins, jewelry heists and traffic violations but on Friday they were charged in a grisly crime spree that ended with police unearthing the bodies of four young men from two pits buried deep on a sprawling family-owned farm.

Police found the missing men after a grueling, five-day search in sweltering heat and pelting rain, but it's still not clear why the 20-year-old suspects' crimes escalated from petty offenses.

For Cosmo DiNardo, whose lawyer said he confessed to all four killings in exchange for being spared the death penalty, brushes with the law began in his early teenage years.

He was about 14 when the Bensalem Police Department first had contact with him. Over the next six years, he had more than 30 run-ins with its officers, department director Frederick Harran said, although court filings reflect only the minor infractions and traffic stops that came after age 18.

DiNardo enrolled at Arcadia University in Glenside in the fall of 2015 with hopes of studying biology and had an eye on international travel, according to a blog post announcing the incoming class.

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Military cyber operations headed for revamp after long delay

WASHINGTON (AP) After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

Under the plans, U.S. Cyber Command would eventually be split off from the intelligence-focused National Security Agency.

Details are still being worked out, but officials say they expect a decision and announcement in the coming weeks. The officials weren't authorized to speak publicly on the matter so requested anonymity.

The goal, they said, is to give U.S. Cyber Command more autonomy, freeing it from any constraints that stem from working alongside the NSA, which is responsible for monitoring and collecting telephone, internet and other intelligence data from around the world a responsibility that can sometimes clash with military operations against enemy forces.

Making cyber an independent military command will put the fight in digital space on the same footing as more traditional realms of battle on land, in the air, at sea and in space. The move reflects the escalating threat of cyberattacks and intrusions from other nation states, terrorist groups and hackers, and comes as the U.S. faces ever-widening fears about Russian hacking following Moscow's efforts to meddle in the 2016 American election.

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Disney Parks name Star Wars lands Galaxy's Edge

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) Disney Parks isn't letting Han Solo or Luke Skywalker save the day at their new Star Wars-themed lands.

"When you step in to the world, you're the hero," Chris Beatty, Disney Imagineer and executive director of the new expansions said.

Beatty was just one of many Disney representatives who spoke Saturday on the new Star Wars-themed lands at the Disney fan expo D23 in Anaheim, California.

Bob Chapek, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts Chairman, led a joyous panel where he unveiled many new projects for both domestic and international parks. New "Ratatouille," ''Guardians of the Galaxy" and "Tron" attractions are headed to Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida.

Discussion of the Star Wars land came early in Chapek's presentation, pleasing an eager audience. A video detailed a model on display at the expo's "A Galaxy of Stories." Then, Chapek revealed the name for the expansions.